Resource Center: Examples from the Field

Section 1

FL Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Safety Plan - Partner Roles

An example of the types of partners and their roles in a pedestrian safety evaluation.

Citation(s):

Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Safety Plan. FL DOT (2013) The Center for Urban Transportation. Prepared by: Research University of South Florida

NY DOT Steps to form evaluation team

An example of the steps taken in to form a successful evaluation team.

Citation(s):

Pedestrian Safety Corridor Evaluation Guidelines. NY DOT (2016)

NC Watch 4 Me Partner Input

An example of how successfully integrate partners into the overall evaluation planning process.

Citation(s):

Watch 4 Me – NC Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety, Education, and Enforcement Campaign: 2014 Program Summary (2014)

NC Watch 4 Me Community and Partner Profiles

Examples of different sized communities across North Carolina (e.g., 100,000+ population, < 25,000) participated in the Watch for Me NC Campaign including descriptions of partnership profiles and key outcomes.

Citation(s):

Watch 4 Me – NC Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety, Education, and Enforcement Campaign: 2014 Program Summary (2014)

Federal Highway Administration, Office of Safety’s Pedestrian Safety Strategic Plan

Example Pedestrian Safety Strategic Plan.

Citation(s):

US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration. Pedestrian Safety Strategic Plan: Recommendations for Research and Product Development. October 2010. FHWA-SA-10-035

New Jersey’s Pedestrian Safety Action Plan

Example Pedestrian Safety Action Plan.

Citation(s):

New Jersey Department of Transportation. (2014). New Jersey Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (An Update to Pedestrian Safety Management in New Jersey: A Strategic Assessment 2005).

San Francisco’s Vision Zero

Example Pedestrian Safety Action Plan

Citation(s):

Vision Zero San Francisco. Two-Year Action Strategy 2017-2018: Eliminating Traffic Deaths in our City.

FL Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Safety Plan - Purpose

Example statement included in pedestrian safety evaluation report.

Citation(s):

Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Safety Plan. FL DOT (2013) The Center for Urban Transportation. Prepared by: Research University of South Florida

NY DOT - Purpose

Example statement included in pedestrian safety evaluation report.

Citation(s):

Pedestrian Safety Corridor Evaluation Guidelines. NY DOT (2016)

Section 2

Section 3

Sample Evaluation Questions

Sample process and outcome evaluation questions for PSAPs or education and promotion campaigns.

Citation(s):

Adapted from: HM Treasury 2011. The Magenta Book: Guidance for evaluation.

Pedestrian Safety Intervention Evaluations and Evaluation Types

Table showing abstracts of pedestrian safety evaluations match with specific evaluation types.

Citation(s):

L. Sandt, Marshall, S.W., Ennett, S.T. Community-Based Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Program: Developmental Framework and Process Evaluation. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Jan 2015, Vol. 2519, pp. 51-60.

Outcome only Albert, R. R., & Dolgin, K. G. (2010). Lasting effects of short-term training on preschoolers’ street-crossing behavior. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 42:500–508.

Lyons, R. A., D., Kendrick, E. M. L.,Towner, C., Coupland, M., Hayes, M, et al. The Advocacy for Pedestrian Safety Study: Cluster Randomised Trial Evaluating a Political Advocacy Approach to Reduce Pedestrian Injuries in Deprived Communities. 2013. PLoS ONE, 8(4), e60158.

Section 4

The effect of cell phone distraction on pediatric pedestrian injury risk.

An article that discusses the effects of cell phone distractions on pedestrian injury risk

Citation(s):

Stavrinos D, Byington KW, Schwebel DC. The effect of cell phone distraction on pediatric pedestrian injury risk. Pediatrics. 2009;123:e179–185

Training Children in Pedestrian Safety: Distinguishing Gains in Knowledge from Gains in Safe Behavior.

An article that discusses an intervention that aimed to educated children in pedestrian safety.

Citation(s):

Schwebel, D. C., & McClure, L. A. (2014). Training Children in Pedestrian Safety: Distinguishing Gains in Knowledge from Gains in Safe Behavior. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 35(3), 151–162. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10935-014-0341-8

Neighborhood-based differences in physical activity: An environment scale evaluation.

Journal article that discusses a research study that measures the walkability in a neighborhood environment.

Citation(s):

Saelens B.E., Sallis J.F., Black J.B., Chen D. Neighborhood-based differences in physical activity: An environment scale evaluation. Am. J. Public Health. 2003;93:1552–1558. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.93.9.1552

Reliability and validity of physical activity questionnaires for children: the Children's Leisure Activities Study Survey (CLASS) Pediatric Exercise Science

Journal article that discusses the use of physical activity among children.

Citation(s):

A. Telford, J. Salmon, D. Jolley, D. Crawford. Reliability and validity of physical activity questionnaires for children: the Children's Leisure Activities Study Survey (CLASS) Pediatric Exercise Science, 16 (2004), pp. 64–78.

Section 5

Section 6